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Full text of "The Tower, 1947"







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ram ^®wni& 

THE STOUT INSTITUTE 
MENOMONIE, WISCONSIN 



WQV 



R A y M I A L. EDITOR 
BETTY KUENZL, BUSINESS MGR. 
DWIGHT CHfNNOCK, ADVISER 




1887-1947 



®n®ii(g3^fii(E)ir 



In Loiiiuj fflrmory of Paul C. iklson 

There are many great men to whom we give praise 
For deeds they've encountered each year. 

There arc others whose battles of life they hove won 
With valor so loyal and so dear. 

There arc men of great wisdom to whom we may go 

For help and advice we desire, 
As a man with knowledge and kindness supreme, 

Vour cooperative spirit we've admired* 

We'll miss your bright smile as we go 'long life's road. 

Your ability to do things right. 
We'll miss your presence where'er we go 

Each morning, noon, and night. 

To the teacher of man we bid thec fare. 

But your memory remains in our heart; 
God has bid you come home and help H«m, too. 

For you've always done more than yout pai 



by George Sodeifoog 




ALMA MATER 



On the banks of Lalce Mcnornin, 
Stands our Alma Mater true 
With Tower high and brilliant 'S' 
For her we'll dare and do 



swig fter pratses many 
We'll glorify her name 
And on thro' out the years of time 
Our love for Stout proclaim. 



r*i] 




President Verne C Fryklund 



C»3 




CLyDE A. BOWMAN 

Dctn of Industrial Education 

Mf« Bowman become Dean of Industrial 
Education in 1919. Executive, teacher, and 
writer, Clyde A. Bowman is a recognized 
leader among teachers of industrial educa- 
tion. Mr. Bowman was the first and only 
Dean of Industrial Education at The Stout 
Institute, He fs a friend to and respected 
by a\\ students, both old and new. 




MERLE M. PRICE 

Dean of Men 

Dean Price has studied at the Univ. 
of Minnesota and also at the State Teach- 
ers college at St, Cloud, Minnesota. His 
valuable teaching and administrative ex- 
periences have proven their worth in his 
position as Dean of Men, 

U has been his responsibility to find 
housing facilities for the men attending 
school here and because of this the Vet- 
erans of Stout have come to fcnow him 
very well. His efforts to find them housing 
has proven to them that he is very effi- 
cient to this position. He can also be given 
credit for the development of our student 
union, which has been one of the out- 
fing advancements this year toward 
a better well rounded student activity pro- 
gram. 






RUTH E. MICHAELS 

De#n of Home Economic* 

Dean Michaels did hcf undergraduate 
study at Milwaukee State Teachers Col- 
lege, The Stout Institute, and the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, She holds a M.S, degree 
from Cofumbia University, During her stay 
at Stout she contributed to the develop- 
ment of Home Economics in the secondary 
schools and also in her work as chairman 
of the Home Economic* curriculum com- 
mittee. The Home Economics Division of 
the college has undergone many improve- 
ments and [novations while Dean Michaels 
has been in charge. Always a friend and 
counselor of the women enrolled in Stout's 
Home Economics Division, Dean Michaels' 
interest in campus activities is shown in 
her faithfulness and ability which she has 
displayed discharging the numerous duties 
and responsibilities of her position. 

The students, faculty, and administra- 
tioii ol Stout, having known Dean Michaels 
as a en! specialist in the educa- 

tional field and as a person of dignity and 
charm, regret her leaving and we all know 
that The Stout Institute is now a better in- 
stitution of learning for her having been a 
member of its faculty. 



KETURAH ANTRIM 
Dc«n of Women 

Miss Antrim was appointed Dean of 
Women in 1945. Through her work with 
women's athletic and social groups, Dean 
Antrim hos gained the respect of the 
women of the college. Among other du- 
ties, Miss Antrim has charge of Women's 
housing problems. This year she has given 
many valuable hours to make the student 
union a success. 





til] 




Left to (tight: Pad C. N hi M. Hi Sodfbrfg. 



Woodworking Department 

Woodworks courses from the beginning of The Stout Institute have been in- 
cluded fn the curriculum. Through the years, many changes have been mode m the 
department both in location and curriculum. A continual study of trends and require- 
ments will also bring many changes in the future. 




C>- T 3 




Lrft ia R.igKm P*: r K llctterfey. FI-. i 



Metaiworlcing Department 

The shops represent opportunities for work with metal, machine toots, sheet 
metal, bench metal, oxy-aectylcne welding, electric arc welding, forging, and heat 
treating. Mastery in the use of tools and skills to forge the implements of industry 
are developed in the shops of the division of metalworking. 








Graphic Arts Department 

The relation of drawing to other industrial courses was seen by Mr, Stout when 
he was setting up his plans for the school, but because of limitations in money and 
facilities as well as a small enrollment, a single course in mechanical drawing was 
incorporated into the curriculum. However, with the enlargement of facilities more 
drawing courses were introduced. At present some sixteen courses are OTiered. 

Whereas drawing has been a part of Stout since the school's conception, its 
related art. printing, has only been taught since 1906. 




CHI 




■■- F. Good. 8*y F. Ki 



Electricity and General Mechanics Department 

The many developments in the fields of electricity and mechanics have made the 
subjects increasingly important. In the laboratories and lecture rooms, principles of 
industrial electricity and mechanics are studied and demonstrated to give students 
greater knowledge of motors and machines which play a great part in the world of 
today. 








Foods and Nutrition Department 

Courses in food** and nut fit ion ore correlated with work in other classes, such 
a*, biology, physiology, and chemistry, The objectives of this departmeni ore the 
planning, purchasing, preparation, and serving of nutritious food in an appetizing 
manner, A'- freshmen and sophomores, the students do basic work in nutrition and in 
food preparation, During their junior and senior years, students may elect courses 

! rig their individual need?, and interests. 




16 I 




Left to Right: Hazel VanNess, Lillian Jeter. 



Clothing Department 

Clothing courses include more than learning to sew a fine seam. In the first year 
work is begun by studying clothing selection and construction. In the second year, 
each student is required to take an advanced clothing course. Other work is elective 
and may include courses in applied dress design, children's ciothing, clothing eco- 
nomics, clothing problems, or history of clothing. 




[17] 




Left to Right: Sigrid Rasmussen, Juliet Johnston. 

Art Department 

When Stout was in its infancy, Interior Decoration and Artistic Home Furnish- 
ings were the titles given to the courses which included work in art. Today the art 
courses are correlated with other home economics work, too. In the first year stu- 
dents are taught the principles of art in their relation to the home and home fur- 
nishings. Advanced art work is offered in classes in creative art, crafts, sketch and 
art history. 




[18] 




i-li i,. M,, t u A'lliu. <:, Bn-.*j.. Artlitn Su " I ■ I Ft. 0*|t>ng Uaigf «1 M*rp«t. DwijM 

Education Department 

The department of education deals with subjects related to the teaching skills, 
i vi!', to educate the prospective teacher in the science of understanding and 
Fulfilling their future students needs. It is this department that contributes a 
lint: in the teacher's background, by supplying him with subjects that arc vital to his 
r«- sourer;; as .» teacher. This department, along with the other departments of the 
school has helped to establish the name of The Stout Institute as a well known de- 
pendable teachers training institution. 




i i" \ 




Left to Right: Ellen Nelson, Thomas Fleming, Gertrud? Cailahan, Wauneta Hain, Barbara Lehr, Mar 



Erich 



English Department 

The duty of the English department is to instill a knowledge of grammar, the 
ability to write correctly, and a love of literature in the minds of a technically 
minded student body. The primary aim of the speech courses is to teach the stu- 
dents to speak well before any group. Requirements for graduation include thirteen 
credits of English courses. Many students also enter elective courses: drama, poetry 
and fiction, thus completing a minor in English. 




[ 20 ;i 




Left to-Right: Ray C. Johnson, June Miller, Keturah Antrim. 



Physical Education Department 

It was Mr. Stout's desire to build the bodies as well as the minds of the stu- 
dents. In accordance with his belief of healthy bodies as well as educated minds, 
most students participate in physical activities. In the spring and fall students may 
take part in outdoor activities such as golf, tennis, field hockey, archery, and base- 
ball. During the winter months the activities include swimming, badminton, bowling, 
volleyball, and basketball. 





i<U to fttghi: Mary M. ■■■ ■ H <rmi>r , Am«on> An*? UjmUL C L. Rkh. EJ^wr K Cm, F. E. Inn 

Science and Mathematics Department 

Mathematics and science courses were early incorporated into the curriculum 
of Stout to serve a? a necessary background m the many technical subjects offered. 
Very few women take courses in mathematics, but both men and women are en- 
rolled in the science courses. However, students may work for a minor in cither field 
and many are qualified to teach either science or mathematics. 








MERLE M. PRICE 




STEPHEN A. STSPHAM 



Social Science Department 

Through social science courses students seek an understanding of the complex 
conditions characteristic of today. It was not until Stout Institute became a state 
institution, that social science was added to the curriculum. Courses in economics. 
sociology, history, government, family, and society 3ivc the student the background 
to understand American political social, and economic life. 




C2*3 



HaroW R. CmIc 



Music Department 



I he music department at The Stout Institute began with an orchestra, a band, 
a men's glee club and a male quartet. From these extra-curricular activities have de- 
veloped credit courses In harmony, music appreciation, conducting, band, orchestra, 
and choral groups. Under the direction of Mr. Cooke, students received instructions 
m techniques in ear training, rhythm motation. diatonic and chromatic scales, chord 
instruction, and acoustics. 




r«] 





RAY A. WIGEN 



STUART ANDERSON 



Graduate School Department 

Graduate work was carried on exclusively during the summer sessions until the 
second semester of the I 945-46 college year when the first regular session of gradu- 
ate courses began. 

Students who hold the degree of Bachelor of Science from The Stout Institute 
or its equivalent, are eligible to take graduate courses. The graduate curriculum is 
planned so prospective teachers and administrators may earn the degree of Master 
of Science with a major in Industrial Education, Home Economics Education, or Vo- 
cational Education. 




CW3 




LILLIAN FROGGATT 
LibMfUfl 




DEIMA PROUD LOCK 





GERTRUDE M. O'BRIEN 
Rcgiitrir 




MINNIE BECKER 
Secretary In the Prctidfnt 




1, M. FUNK 




H. Oi STROZINSKT 


iii-niris ,M«ni:;cr 


Business Staff 


Chief Engl nee) 



The purpose of the business staff is.to sec that the clerical, medical, and liter- 
ary components of the school, attain the utmost efficiency possible in the fulfill- 
ment of their duties at Stout. The clerical branch in general, accounts for all of the 
correspondence and office duties of the school* The medical branch includes all of 
the work related to keeping the students healthy. And the literary branch includes all 
of the work in connection with the library and its duties. These three branches com- 
pose another important department at The Stout Institute. Among the duties of 
the registrar are supervision of the many problems involved in admissions and credits, 
as well as aiding in senior placement in the fields relating to Industrial Arts and 
Home Economics. 







LuJi ro Right: Ca^it'; Efidban, Margaret Co«. Hadand HeiKlman. 



THE SENIOR CLASS 



President 
HARIAND HESSELMAN 



Vice President 
JOHN MORGAN 



Secretary 
MARGARET COX 



Treasurer 
CARLTON ERICKSON 



Advisers 

OR. A. MARSHALL. MR, R. BETTERLEY 

The Senior Class, as its part in making homecoming a success, decorated the 
Home Economics corn dor and built a small "fog cabin" registration booth to carry 
out the theme "Welcome Back with the Lumber Jack," 

The seniors worked on various committees under the auspices of the S.5.A, to 
plan and sponsor all-school activities. 

Being a wartime class of small membership, all the seniors were happy at the 
return of the many veterans who joined the class this year. 



£2*1 




RUTH AANESS BERNARD 6AETSON JOHN fiAIRD 

UCicuc.V' Gtrcfl ftflj, 1 Rim* I 



Saw, BE LC ASTRO 

" 



DONALD BRILL 



WALTER CAVE 

" 



MAURICE CHRISTIANSON 

Gle<i*oc*d City W »- 



LVLE CROSBY 




DONALD CASS 



WILLIAM CHRISTIANSON 

• -. W*. 



MARGARET COX 



KARL DETTMANN 






GEORGE 0* RUSElS 
I 



CARITON ERtCKSON 
n Bay. NX'.*. 



LtONR GARDINER 



RUTH GILGENBACH 




ANNE HAPT 



HARLAND HESSELMAN 



MARLATIE MOtTZ 



PAUL iNGWELl 

tumb^rlarH 



[1] 



I LA JERDE 

Combed, Wis. 



PHYLUS JOHNSON 
Monro*, Wik 



LOIS KLUSMErER 

Evanivill*. W<\. 



HELEN KRANZUSCH 
ionic Wit, 




MILD RIO JOHNSON 



RUTH KLIN MIR 
M«tfl 



OOROTHr KOriSCHKE 

w«. 



RAY KRANZUSCH 




WARREN LE£ 



GORDON LINDtERG 

lfQfl*CHSfl). M<h. 



DONALD LIPFOLD 
Omgo. Ill 



tEUUH McDowell 

Di Soto, •■' 



[H] 



EIDA ELLEN MeKENZIE 
St Cwi ; 



RICHARD MeKINNiy 
g Felts, Via. 



ROBERT MARTIN 
KaniBi City. Kan. 



DONALD MENNING 

Wflupan, 



ARTHUR WIDTH E 




MARV LOU MErEfi 



RONALD MIDDLESTADT 

Boytevill*. Wn. 



G. LORRAINE NELSON 
W.v Otllt. Wii, 



LUCILLE NELSON 

Miflflf*p r :''1 Mini. 



PATRICIA O'CONNOR 
p.- nncapa v Minn. 



n J2:i 



LOUIS ODE 



JAMES PA/NE 

- 



PRI5CILLA OETTMEtR 
Fort All nwi X 



WILLIAM PETERSON 




ALTON RIGOTTJ 



HARVEy RISTOW FRANCIS ROWE 

""if:*. '■' . Wrl, 



CHARLES RICHARDSON 







1 - \ 



VIRGINIA RUSSELL 



IENMMIN SANDERS 



ROBERT SAND IN 
v - - 



JANICE SHAEFER 



JOSEPH SERFLEK 

Cbdafcy, Wit. 



JEAN THOMPSON 



aiCHAfto voip 



GILES WOOLF 




PATRICIA TELFORD 

OeoMe. 'v. 



MARTIN VITZ 

Sup**'--- 



KENNETH WOLD 



LAWRENCE WRIGHT 



L«] 



Seniors not included with pictures. 



WILLIAM ANDERSON, Menomonie, Wis, 
WILLIAM ANDREWS, Superior, Wis. 
BRUCE CAMERON, Appleton, Wis. 
JOHN CARDINAL, Chippewa Falls, Wis. 
DOROTHY CONDRy, Plattevil'e. Wis. 
MARY ANN DODGE, Menomonie, Wis. 
WILLIAM DRESDEN, Arkansaw, Wis. 
MARSHALL ELSON, Gilbert, Minn. 
BEVERLY FJELSTED, Cameron, Wis. 
PAUL GEHRKE, Menomonie, Wis. 
LEONARD HELGESON, Menomonie, Wis. 
DONALD IVERSON, Menomonie. Wis. 
JOHN JEFFERS, Menomonie, Wis. 
CHARLES KNOPPS, Menomonie, Wis. 



MARK KOPJAR, Irvington, Wis. 
JAMES LEIGH, Beaver Dam, Wis. 
JEANNE LEMON, Menomonie, Wis. 
SILLIE MASEK, Wonewoc, Wis. 
CONRAD MAYER, Peshtigo, Wis. 
ROBERT MERK, Menomonie, Wis. 
MILTON MILLER. Racine, Wis. 
KILMER MOE, Honolulu, Hawaii 
JOHN MORGAN, Nashotah, Wis. 
YVONNE OLSON, Superior, Wis. 
CATHERINE PAULy, Slingcr. Wis. 
MARJORIE POWERS, Milwaukee, Wis. 
HAROLD RICHTER, Sheboygan, Wis. 
MARIAN ROSS, Menomonie, Wis. 



MARCEILE SANDER, Fond du Lac, Wis. 
BETTE SCHELLIN, Eland, Wis. 
CARL SEITZ, Menomonie, Wis. 
JAMES SHULTIS, Reedsbu.-g, Wis. 
GORDON SKOUGE, Menomonie, Wis. 
ROBERT SOLIE, Menomonie, Wis. 
EDRIA SONTAG, Stillwater, Minn. 
HUGH TYLER, Menomonie, Wis. 
SHIRLEY WASEEN, Superior, Wis. 
CHARLES WEBER, Sprin S field, Minn. 
FRANK WENDT, Menomonie, Wis. 
HERBERT WENDT, Menomonie, Wis. 
REV. ROBERT WEST, Richardton, No. Dak. 
ROBERT WILL, Menomonie, Wis. 




[35] 



in And^pwn, Them** iCmj. Lo^d Vtndtbt'y, 
£*flffdr B^foc Hughe*, Owrgtit NitKolt. t* •-- Xaw* Ab*. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Officer* of Graduate Mcn'i Club 



President 

DWIGHT NICHOLS 
GEORGE BOWERS 



Vice President 

MURRAy CLIFF 

/ASO ABE 



Seactaiy 
JEAN ANDERSON 
BYRON HUGHES 



Advucf 
RAY A, WfGEN 



The Graduate Men's Club functions as the class organization for the Graduate 
Division. The activation of the club was concurrent with the establishment of the 
Graduate Division at the beginning of the Fall term of this year. Previously the only 
formal organization of graduate men had been during the summer sessions since 
1935. The purposes of the club arc expressed by: good fellowship and professionali- 
lation in Industrial Education. At intervals during the school year, discussions, talks 
by vwtins speakers and movies held the attention of the members. Membership in 
the Graduate Mens Club has two prerequisites: interest and enrollment in the Grad- 
uate Division. 

CM3 



f-«| J- ~\ *~!-f 



MINORU ABE 
• U rqIuJu, H4w.11 



GEORGE BOWERS 



BYRON HUGHES 

Carols ft, V,'.;. 



WILLIAM McNElL 
Baibcwiivak Ky, 



WALDER ROBBiNS 
Spo ri 1 r. Wii, 



YASO ABC 

Ho-nolu'u, Hn wfti- 



JEAN ANDERSON 

Milwaillrr WH. 




•' 





rfb 



JAMES BLACK 




TOSHIO HAGIWARA 

Nofltrlan. Hft«f«i' 



THOMAS KING 
Mfnomonlc, Wis, 



D WIGHT NICHOLS 
Ml. Offth. 



IRVING STJBEft 
Scribnc, N^bf. 



i:-'7;i 



DOROTHY THOMPSON 



WILLIAM WATSON 
Tucunw**f. W, Me* 



carl wicklund 

M no. 




LLOYD VANOEBURG 
N«iflivill< r Wifc, 



EUGENE WERELV 

Eu'linglon, Wiv 



JOHN W1ERMAN 
Wafdo. W,s. 



Graduates not included with the pictures. 

DAVID BARNARD, Mmmw**. W t RUTH DAVIK, Shdl Lite. Wis. GORDON OAS5, Mtaomo™, Wh. 

IRVfNG BEHM. Wood^B., W!,. WILUAM FLA NAGAN. felcU. W*. CHARUS SKIER. M.^Ic, V,. 

MURRAY CLIFF. CTg«* C fl( ,ad* JOHN JOHNSON, Mwomorfc. Wit ALVIN WUTTI. U Ci««, W«. 

ELL6N NELSON. Ccysti 



• 




C*>3 



Mir 



Right.; Gea-$t Tin<tti, Lorain* tichon. Walt" DuwJd, Don«fd P«rtab< 



THE JUNIOR CLASS 



President 

WALTER DUSOLO 



Vice President 

DONALD PANGBORN 



Secretary 
LORRAINE NELSON 



Treasurer 
GEORGE TINETTI 



Adviser 

MISS 1 JOHNSTON 



Remember homecoming of 1946? It certainty was like "old times" to have the 
.edows end alumni bacSt on the campus again. The junior class helped to make home- 
coming a big success by decorating the "barn" and making it into a "dance hall 
dream" for the annual all-school and alumni dance. 

May 17 was a big date too. Remember? The date is passed, but our memories 
connected with decoration, program, chaperones. and refreshments will live forever. 
Memories of homecoming, spring formal, and the many other activities surety have 
made this year a pleasant one to put in our book of memories. 



, :,;i 




AOELE ANDERSON 
AODREy ANDSEASSON 
DONALD SABST 

JOSEPH SACK NIK 

JAMES BAILEY 
OMER flENN 

DORIS MAE BRIM Eft 
CLIFFORD 6URTNESS 



JEAN CANTR6LL 
LENO CAftAOORI 
MARy CHIN NOCK 
IRVING CHRISTENSEN 

HALVOR CHRIS! IANSON 
DAVID DAIL/ 
EMMA De CANTER 
JUNE EDS6ERG 

RONALD EHART 
SHIRLEY ERICK&ON 
MILDRED FRASE 
ALICE FROEBA 

FREEMAN GALOFF 
SEVERLV GIKLING 
GENEVIEVE GOFF 

JEANNE GONSOLIN 



l'«3 



(P. -v.' 



IOUH GOODMCH 
if Atjrn SMBNLII 
urcitAito HAMILTON 

MAR*. A AM HANSOM 

rim nii'-.M -■ ' J I • 
GIORtif Hl'NMIOCSON 
QUDVS HOI f MAN 
ka!iu,EW HOftUJ 



gF.RHAUIl HUOHtS 
nrroHt) INGWILl 

iynn KiNGSttr 

HAHOI I) KOtlH 

JOHN KNOCK 
nosr KA06 
ItTlv KUBNZI 
RlCMAAD XUttSHtNSKV 

ALlCt M^VICAR 
HltlN Ml I Vlll l 
CLAMNi i MMKlft 
JOY MUftKliy 

JOSEPH mocogni 

MAflMN Min ii I n 
MWAflDMUtlUft 
PON A 10 PANCilCWl 








I 12 I 




MAXIHE mitt 
MARGARET PENNINGTON 
AfiLCNE PICK 
VCRINA MICE 

HELEN QUILLING 
JAMES ROCKWELL 
Villi AM ROERIG 
MARV RUDOW 

■LA SAUTH-R 

KENNETH SCMANK 
JOHN SCHIELKE 
SHIRLEY SCHNITZLEft 

ROIERT SIMS 
iMSiy SLAMAft 
MIRIAM T« IEEST 
ROIERT THOMAS 

IRUCt THOMPSON 
ROIERT THOMPTO 
MARiORIi THUIL 
GEORGE TINETTI 

LOWEU TUFT 
GIISON VAN PATTER 
CAROL WIODIR 
MAXIM VCURT7 



CUJ 



Jon Ion 

BQftIA A VINSON 
LAWUlMff lENMM 
LQUIJ0IL0W 
WIlLAflD HMSON 

|OK€l Pl-MirliAKti 
J A MF'> MilNO 

MAftGANfci II/6MANAN 
DON eONNIHW 
WAAtJ COWLtS 
I AWAINCE uecKtft 
ItOIIAl 6U€HAftMf 
WALTiR OUSGLG 

-htm tnK.HV.iN 

II 0A1IIN 
WMUAM GAAMIQS 



not inoliicfed with the pioturai. 
hoUERtA MANION 
MM HOftAN 
•in t HSLTIB 
iCAM [NfltlNtAIN 

MNIIF. KAIfKARU 
MANfoKIF MUtHMAH 
GUtifNf KRAM&CNUifSK 

I KflAMf.t 

ttUV KUtKUK 
HC&rtNT ItHMAMN 
MGLVIN IIMON 
WILLfAM j IMS IMG 
OELl LlMBlOOM 
WILLIAM LMJ 
MARX LOU OH 



fleSiftl f ARSONS 
MAKIMf PlM€fi 

l.-HH mi. 

IA€K rowM" li 

CMAWLtS WCHAflnliON 

of to ROCKI 
i=ih?ar rtoss 
IDWAKO SAXNAI/0 
APfiUNI SCHA^IR 

MARCH senilis 

Wftll AM IWDEF 
JAMtt HMMtWMAM 
Mi hi MAM WATSON 

stiviM um 





c«a 














■ 








.J^BImi urn —» ■■■■ 


MM* 




— * 


«j — 


~^L .j 


*" 




Left to Right: Euf«fi« Uyr<, U II rj. fmnth Va'l«y. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



PfCiideflt 

EUGENE DYKE 



Vice President 
KENNETH SCHANK 



etary 

HENRIETTA GUELZOW 



Treasurer 
FRANCIS VALLEy 



Adviicr 
MR. G. SODERBERG 



As members of the decorating committee, the sophomores contributed to the 
success of homecoming by providing a well-decora ted town. 

In keeping with the Christmas spirit, we were also called upon the decorate the 
gym for the annual Christmas dance. The gay tidings of the holiday was expressed in 
decorations of evergreen boughs and a colorfully-decorated Christmas tree. 

During second semester, two members were elected to the Student Governing 
Board. We celebrated the conclusion of ar» active year with the traditional class 

picnic. 



i: " i 




Row Orw: Z«fl« R-k Htoei, W.Hma Lewmnnt, Mritia Houk Mary A™ Howie V,. 3 ; n!a SsKrimpf. HiyUn, Wa'tK Row? M«»v Olbtrt, 

HoUitI Okuyarna. 
Row Two: /.-an Oilfm*n r Hden TupaV, Palncls Moc«, KoOiryn Gerord«*l*, Audrey Vi S <nni. Oeb<ct Egjebrethr J**n St«J 

\XMwn. 
Row Thf«; Jcwph Unao, /ohn PoUm**. Raymond Ooane. ElUwort't Kan«. Painft Haiaria.n Jc*n W<kk. 
ftp'* F*m: VicJo* Hmdr^i, Kenneth bailing. CHydt SclWlenbacK, Atv-n, AMf. Finr-1 C 1-3*1. Etj 




Row One: MHdfed H.inion, 9fui<et Seniors. Roiunn Bongcy. Jean, Lindblfid. Joyce l-uhrmsfift. Oleda SaSlarvd**, Dorothy Kcpp. 
Row l«a; Vii$ini» JacHon, Eil«n Ollliian. Oom Zimmerman, Lou Friberj,. born Counted, Carol Bftai»*d. Betty AchteilieK. 
Row Three.: John Ru'fo-. Dou^tai Shcirnan, M««ion Pientol, France* 0*{*um. John Bongev. Donald Ew 

! ur: Herbrjt Bftrnha»t, Paul U'ten, Lcun Bumv .•■ W ,,m Bottomley, William B«a*dvefd. Curl* R 

C473 




•-.-: Air«rt Slctumb, Rwc Sdooni. ELit.c l*c«*wil. Audrey Hjilardfr. Betty Deng eUueJrc L.rdbcf|, MiylKt pn»s«- 
■ c- T.,: Marian LcmVe. Den*o KragK PhylCii Miller. Beverly Ruvd.ii. Kelma Fuller, OUc BrowrnslL Ruth Matty, Blame J 



'■'■: h 

Re* W* Jria Koto. Hiiiwev Pdcnen. Robert jaclien, WciFey Lund, Eugene Slated. Paul P*rtiidg*. Theodore TcS.cM«, 
Row Four: UKcy Paiwiii. Richard H*s«ad. Jamcf Lar-5<. Jame* T«Sg«n. Dona'd RaeUier. 



obnion. 




Row 0"e; Lwwifle Schfeu^h, Verne tl Eilifiger, Jeai Nyrflfidcr, Josa Wildncf. Jeafi Murphy, FloienK Tccjardcn. 
V7.i> V. --i Barbara Z*tftta, Shirley Soefcberg. Jean Kjllon, Jean Schwal'D*. Dorvald Chrij(oph«wn. 
Row Three: iahr. Ernd.t. Rob<r? McKay. Mark Hubcr, Raymond CornweU. Wirlrom Hornbec*. Francis Perrlgoue. 
fig* Four; Wvir Ihgma*. Robert Swanscui. Richard Sutton. George Zimmerman. 

C«3 



Sophomores not included with pictures. 



ALBRACHT, WILLIAM 
ANDERSON. NORMAN 
BAETC. ARTHUR 
BANOLOW. WALTER 
BEERS, JACQUES 
IEBGHUIS, LETIT1A 
BEVRER. ILENE 
BJORNSEN BEN AAA 
BOHN, JAMES 
BRACKEN. SHERIDAN 
BRANTNER, DONNA 
BROMAN, ELDON 
BUTLER, CHARLES 
CHAMBERLINE, LOIS 
CFGAN. LORRAINE 
CONN EL, VICTOR 
CONWAY, MARTIN 
Of*. JEAN 
DAILY, DAVID 
DESMARIS, ROBERT 
OE VOE, GEORGE 
DYKE. EUGENE 
ET7INGER, OLIVE 
fELTHOUSE, ALLAN 
GANDT, RICHARD 
GORR, WALTER 



GUELZOW. HENRIETTA 
GUTHRIE, RUTH 
HALL, RUSSELL 
HAMMERBURG, WALLACE 
HANKE, RAYMOND 
HAYWOOD. MARILYN 
HEEBINK, ROBERT 
HENDRICKSON. GEORGE 
HENSEY. LOIS 
HEJtSING, RICHARD 
HOfFMAN. PHYLLIS 
JANSSEN. BERNICE 
JEWEL, JANICE 
JOLLIFE. MAURJEL 
KEHRBERG, ROLAND 
KELLERMAN. ROBERT 
KNOWLES. RUTH 
KURSHINSKY, RICHARD 
LAWSON, WARREN 
LUNDIN, MARY 
MtLACHLAN. WILLIAM 
McQUAOE. GEORGE 

McQueen, donald 
maki. ovia 
medtley, esther 
mistek. mathew 



MOUSZEWSKI, RICHARD 
MOLNER, ROBERT 
NATZ, DONALD 
NELSON. GERHARD 
NELSON, NORMA 
OETTMEIER, ARTHUR 
OLSON. MELVJN 
ONARHEIM, JOYCE 
OS BORN. HAROLD 
RERRIGOUE, FRANCIS 
RIEMER. GOLORIA 
RILEY. EILEEN 
SCHELLIN, JAMES 
SEITZ, RA* 
SMITH, GRACE 
SORENSON. CLIFFORD 
SORENSON, JACK 
STEVENS, ODELL 
TEEGARDEN. FLORENCE 
TUGT, LOWELL 
VALLEY. MARY 
VAN RANST. ARLYSS 
WARN. LLOYD 
WEILAND. ROBERT 
WELCH. TREASA 
WINBERG, ROGER 



L^'M 




I ft • 



ttUtli, 1:- ! ll t>l 



• • 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



IcjiI 

ROBEKi J ' 



WARREN i 



■-titty 

RUTH i Mi-T.lt, i£| 



i i Htifcr 

mm a f>«i/M/.' ■ 



DEAN AN TRIM. MR. H, ARNESON 



H«r«- #« ore the freihmen, Afl*r* lirml '^uletion in September we numbered 
• the tofge*l clan in the I Ittory ol ih.- Stoul Institute, Ouj ftol task wot thai om 
n to all freihmon daises al this college ft ,vr buili the homecoming bonfire, 
11 ii bonfire 47 feel in height »wai, In the opinion of many, the fargeit in the 
hittory of Stout During the second semester, we mode our wny into if..- ,- i n | lif< 

: ' i: '• We play ! ; : al several I insketbell hops and presented 6 Mardi 

1 irai M uq leredi Boll, In mating a name for ourselves, w« have a< hfeved goalj to 
ward «hl I Future cfasjci may well strive. Although w* would like to remain In the 
limelight, we hop* thai Futon '.lasses will sheth i these u*cords r for, by doing so, 

, ivIH i reotC a li'-Mrr Mout. 



i: *• .1 




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.... 

I i .., 

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i . ■ Mil I iti • I ' ■■'■'' 

i i I Ahrmi * i il rj ,. 

Ik 
Ran \hn !■■-., I nfdfd WJHwn III I -.,.■■. B<f«. 

... : , . | ! I '•««!. 

I t| | 




*cr« Or*; Carefyn Ingham. Nancy Glean, Alice Motl. Lc i Quit! Pyclhy Huky. G»acc Gufdha-jg 

Rit» Two; MarJ«fyn friction. PaWc n Gardner, B-;fcty Hcyer, Mario-'ie Kelkrman, Msvij K*amer, Mary Ho*M. Margaret P««y, 

R?-» "hri'<r Marolk HoFWs, H-:rfatf5 Wcitdif, WilSiam Amjhor, GFen Brod in, Amelia Matetich. 

Row four: Donald d«. Quanc- PaykJtricr. Neil h'.o.a. Robert Mac*!n„ Jean Hurr-md. Rr<hafd Honibujeln!. 




I 9 '" &**• Marioife Wwpl. taict ftottj^, Alvcia Wiisling. Itsb-cE Vandebcr-g, Dorii Nefiillcr.. ftuth Noticf. Nancy Pauf. 
Ro- W. Lili N<ttorv. Gertrude ftebinrors. Ardell Kngtiofl, Sett/ Jftrirt. Shirley Jsnnwwi, Elko MtGaity. Roialie Oith. Joyce Meyer, 
Carolmr Laftjcr. 

Row Thr« : M«Uh«* jaajai; Jeanne W, fr fl rc; : Knfelii, Motfcme Negard. Rgth Kitehner, Beverly Wy^sn, Irene RicdcL Kenneth Krohn. 
Raw Four; Pauf Vctt«f. No.bert Schcll. Ch«t<r W*»lew*. *ayroond W«lieF, John LurqyJn. Mcilin Mooie. Waiien PKiMipi. 



E«3 




Row One; Arcfdle Llelike, jean Windier, Darlcnc Nclien, Patricia Jonev Ms King. Marilyn KeSly, Janet Vog", 

Row Two: Don* Smith. Alice Oat**, Anita Sandc*ion, Dotarej Pctenoiv DcIoks PrHol, Dcloney Johnson. Baine Johnion. 

Row Three; Maigaret Peiman. Mauri Qetlc, George Jcnten, tfrwiecee Yhtttimtt, R<Wd JmiudoRi Wc'fief Schmidt. Rodeer Lartdgtaf. 

Naomi Wrrridl, DoroShy fteimcr. 
Row Four: John Bait. Bernard Fi*hcr, Eugene land*.'*!, Vaughn Stfli, Robert Marine, Fred Wen'ors, 




Row One: ShTnAu yamamolo. Florence Sevenon, Gcttwde P«ovo*t, Aubrey Pahloei, Gtaife Sehn^L Bcnwd Sathv--- 
Row Two: John Gandt. Robert Hendrickren, Da*yf Cain. Orv-,1 Wl«y. Albert Ponw. Fran! ianl Bradley fl*M. Robert WltaM. 
Row Thwe: Richard PocH. lyle JaSmnvjn, Henry JaquijJi, Omti Spcittad. Atlyn Praeht, Ihcnat Sterner Edw.n S«**H«hn*iere*. 
Row Four: George Kieiier, Kenneth RoberU. Donovan Rhead, Waftef Re**. Henry Uhlma^n, Emery Netwn. Dale 5*v*rt. 




Row One: Peggy Welch, Mickey Madsen, Ruth Samdahl, Vivian Rotnem, Grace Watson, Verle Sneen. 

Row Two: Russell Larson, Clemence Santoski, Gerald Solie, Roland Kickbush, Dale Schendal, Herbert Watanabe, Marvin Madsen. 

Row Three: Alan Reed, Clifford Scott, John Prok, Glenn Brooks, Donald Smith, Robert Stabcnfcldt. 



Freshman not included with pictures. 



Abrahamson, Helge 
Alston, Irma 
Anderson, Milo 
Annis, Jack 
Ayers, Charles 
Babick, Robert 
Bachmann, Robert 
Baetsen, Robert 
Barrette, Donald 
Bade, Robert 
Bennington, James 
Benzel, Lee 
Berg, Rodney 
Berger. Chester 
Berstrom, James 
Bestor, Elaine 
Bjornson, Mary 
Blaesing, Robert 
Boctcher, Bert 
Borchardt, Harold 
Bottomley, William 
Brack, Carol 

Bredahl, Donald 

Brewer, Irma 

Brimer, Robert 

Brusen, Carroll 

Burmeister, Louis 

Cairns, Robert 

Caloud, Wanda 

Chaffee, Sidney 

Clark, Frank 

Cyr, Joan 

Denier, Lloyd 

Dole, Donald 

Donley, Gerald 

Donovan, George 



Dreyer, Sherman 
Dunn, Quentin 
Ebert, Edwin 
Edwards, Ralph 
Eggert, Elmer 
Einum, Janet 
Elkington, Thomas 
Emerson, Ronald 
Engen, Lloyd 
English, John 
Erickson, Roger 
Ferguson, Alden 
Forehand, Lois 
Friebel, Marvin 
Gandt, John 
Gannegan, Lloyd 
Good, Gerald 
Goodrich, Murray 
Govin, Walter 
Grudichak, Stephen 
Grundsted, Robert 
Grutt, Ardell 
Gutschenritter, Rich 
Halverson, James 
Hall, John 
Hanna, Robert 
Hannes, Robert 
Hanson, Donald 
Hanson, Robert 
Hanson, Rodney 
Hanson, Rodger 
Hartsell, David 
Haucke, Ernest 
Hayer, Bette 
Hayes, George 
Hehli, William 



Heinemann, George 
Heish, Glenn 
Hendrickson, Harold 
Hendnes, Victor 
Hendrikson, Lynos 
Henslin, Darrell 
Hentz, Thomas 
Hoffman, David 
Hogan, William 
Houg, Robert 
Houle, John 
Hubanks, LeRoy 
Hurd, Robert 
Iverson, Douglas 
Janssen, Gustav 
Jeatran, Daniel 
Jeatran, Richard 
Jerde, Ingle 
Johnson, Calvin 
Johnson, Lloyd 
Johnson, Richard 
Josephson, William 
ard Kaiser, John 

Katalinich, Joseph 
Kelton, Jean 
Kendall, Stanley 
Kihek, Edwin 
Kleven, Lawrence 
Kopp, Paul 
Krueger, Paul 
Kunz, Paul 
LaBorde, Philip 
Lammer, Joan 
Langhorne, Robert 
Larsen, Jerome 
Larsen, Paul 



LaYerty, Kenneth 
Le Clercq, Francis 
Lewis, Earl 
Lindgren, Marvin 
Line, Robert 
Madsen, Melva 
Mauier, Edward 
Mays, Joseph 
Mcsic, John 
Michaelis, Donald 
Michalsen, Howard 
Minarik, Leonard 
Moe, Alton 
Moe, Virgil 
Moessner, Raymond 
Moore, Nan 
Morley, Robert 
Money, Ronald 
Nathanson, Shelley 
Nelson, Irvin 
Nelson, Lloyd 
Neumann, John 
Norton, Herbert 
Nowaskey, Charles 
Oda, Kenneth 
Olson, Harris 
Ooley, James 
Owen, Eilliam 
Pacholski, Severyn 
Palmer, Neil 
Pardun, Ervin 
Pardun, Harvey 
Parsons, LeRoy 
Pautzer, Mary 
Pederson, Lloyd 
Pepper, Rhoda Ann 



Petryk, Raymond 
Plewa, Chester 
Poellinger, John 
Porter, Galen 
Potthast, Arnold 
Qualley, Clayton 
Queram, Norman 
Radtke. Dolores 
Ralph, Edward 
Rayburn, Willa 
Reem, Norman 
Reppert, Owen 
Ridgeway, Thomas 
Rilley, Keith 
Roen, Richard 
Roepke, Richard 
Rotnem, Manford 
Rotnem, James 
Rudow, John 
Scavarda, Lawrence 
Scheffler, Paul 
Schmidt, Alvirt 
Schmidt. Violet 
Scholl, Lucerne 
Schroeder, William 
Schwalbe, John 
Schwellenbach, August 
Seager, Roland 
Senty, Allan 
Settles, Homer 
Sims, Herbert 
Slattery, Louis 
Slind, Gerald 
Slocumb, Aileen 
Sommers, Glen 



Smith, Donald 
Smith, Ralph 
Smith, William 
Snow, Grace 
Sossi, Joseph 
Spoerl, George 
Sporter, William 
Stanek, Carol 
St. Clair, Robert 
Styer, Gerald 
Swanson, Jean 
Tank, David 
Teppen, Thompson 
Thomas, Charles 
Tibbetts, Manlyn 
Vandeberg, Ethyl 
Van Dien, John 
Van Loon, Laren 
Wagner, Douglas 
Wasinger, Gordon 
Whitconb, Robert 
Wilberg, Arnold 
Wild, Donald 
Williams, Malcom 
Willink, Robert 
Wilson, Dorothy 
Wilton, Margaret 
Wooley, John 
yorkston, Robert 
young, Robert 
young, James 
young, William 
yount. John 
Zehms, Donald 
Zelemka, Jerome 



n-n 



^ 




-• "■ "•■■■■■ 






. ■. i ..-.m Andtnan, Kfohaid tfcK'ni " ! 



Pr< dent 
RICHARD McKfNNEY 

Secretory 

MARJORIE THULL 



Pretidenl 

CAROL W1DDER 

Treo«jicr 

WILLIAM ANDERSON 



Stout Student Association 

The Stout Student Association is an organization whose primary purpose Is to encourage a 
spirit of school cooperation and to secure for the students a definite responsible voice in student 
affairs, Four student executives are elected each spring to represent the student body before the 
administration. 

The main activities of the S. S, A, this year was the organizing and establishing the student 
government and installation of new college and dorm regulations. Among the social functions 
sponsored by S. S. A, were the Senior Frolic, The Christmas Dance, The Open House at the gym, 
and Homecoming which was said to be the best in years. 



r.5ft;i 





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ft f A 


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1 tf 


At 




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ii 


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#4* 





# ♦ 'f . 



! . 



Row One; Dean towm/m, Carlton Etieks^n, Alvm Wuiti, Robert Thomas, L*wncnc« Wiitjht, p«ul C- Nefw*. 

R.OW two: Mr. Kianiusch, Mr, Good, Mr, Chiflfloct, Mf, Hirnton, M«. Carlion, Mr. MtJn«, Mr, Sod*ftwf«., M>. S»y. 

Row th*«s pagf tng-vll, Gilct Woof I. K>1me< Mpc. Word Cowfet, Jam« Po r «*. D<wi«ld LlppoM, lr*-rj Omttcmuh Mdvm L 

Haw four: lean AnrJ**too, John Rlcci l|i, WiSli mm Cfvitliantai, Dwight Niclioli, Alton R'jotti". Joi*| • irwce Canwrafl, Hanofd 

Kob»n, M«fFet1? Holt*, Thomot King, William Andeiton. CJirfwd IngwcEI. Z«*« Pmil. 
Row Five; Irving B«AfH R.cb<rr? M*rt>n. Wfttiefl L«<, Haifa nd Hciwlman, David Bafnnrd. lout Ode, ICtiemh WoW. Ray KianiVKh. 

Roland K.-hrb^a, John Cardinal 



EPSILON PI TAU 



ALVIN wutti 

Sccretoty.Trcosurcr 
ROBERT THOMAS 



Vice Ptt:< 

CARLTON ERICKSON 

Assistant Secretary-Treasurcf 

LAWRENCE WRJGHT 



Trustee 
DEAN CLYDE A, BOWMAN 

Epsilon Pi Tau is a national honorary professional fraternity in industrial arts and industrial- 
vocational education whose members are chosen on the basis of scholastic and professional abi! 
ity. 

This organization recognizes the place of skill in industrial education, aids in the develop- 
ment of social efficiency, and fosters and encourages research and the use of research results in 
its professional fields of interest. 

Its many activities include an annual field trip, visits to schools and industrial establish- 
ments, and at least one professional contribution to the work of the college each semester. 



C573 



PHI UPSILON OMICRON 



President 
PATRICIA TELFORD 

Secretary 

RUTH KLINNER 



Vice President 
RUTH AANESS 

Treasurer 

MARGARET COX 



Advisory Council 

MISS MICHAELS 

MISS TRULLINGER 

MISS CRUISE 

MRS. SMITH 

Tau Chapter of Phi Upsilon Omicron, a national professional home economics fraternity, 
endeavors to promote the professional and social growth of the home economics students of The 
Stout Institute. To carry out these aims they have edited a spring and fall newsletter, which is 
sent to all alumni and have had a number of speakers who have talked about various phases of 
home economics. In order to finance their chapter, they have sold ice cream bars at the dormi- 
tories during exam week and at basketball games. They also sponsored an open meeting for aii 
home economics students. Phi U also extends its professional activities by sending textile boxes 
to home economics teachers of Wisconsin. 




Row One: Miss Cruise, Ruth Klinner, Ruth Aaness, Patricia Telford, Margaret Cox, Miss Trullingcr. 
Row Two: Adele Anderson, lla Jerde, Marjorie Gould, Edria Sontag, Mildred Johnson. 
Row Three: Mary Ann Dodge, Miriam TeBeest, Marjorie Thuil. 

[58] 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 



President 
CONRAD MAYER 

Secretary 
GORDON LINDBERG 



Vice President 
HELEN KRANZUSCH 

Treasurer 
THOMAS KING 



Adviser 
MISS ERICKSON 



The M.A.P. Chapter of Alpha Psi Omega started out the year by presenting the very suc- 
cessful performances of "Her Master's Voice" at homecoming. The play not only provided enter- 
tainment for many students and alumni, but also gave interested students the opportunity to 
earn part of the required points for admittance into the fraternity. 

The highlight of the year's activities was attendance at Maurice Evans' production of 

"Hamlet." 

The threefold purpose of the fraternity members is: developing an appreciation for drama, 
attaining skill in the act of impersonation, and providing training which may serve as a prepara- 
tion for future activity in amateur production. 




Row One: Thomas King, Helen Kranzusch, Miss Erickson, Gordon Lindbers. 

Row Two: Kenneth Schank, Patricia Telford, Shirley Schnitzler, Eida Ellen McKenzie, Mildred Johnson, Francis Rowc, Clarence Merkley, 



Lloyd Vandeberg. 



L-59 3 




Re* One: D*. 5t«pT»Mi An - AMI Cm ton Ei ebon, Irwirig Chi'jtcnum. Edgar Rest, M<I»nn Lemon- 

Rcw T*o: fticliard Mc>Crn?i<y, F«c«/nen GafeFf, Benjamin Sande't Dana'd Parsgbo<n. Teibk> Hagiwara. Marcel Schrej*. L<fl<c iOtr.<laru, 

St* TfiiMi 2<-n4» Fruit. William Ard«rsoTi, Phillip CJ"Jst!anscn, Maurice Chrijtianion, 8yron Hi*ghe», i*m<s Bailey, Donald lippoid, K<n- 

r.' L h 5c!w,t. 
Re- Feu?; Rob*?: Martin Lauw Ode. Odell Stevent. John Caiauial. Eugene Dyfcc, M'.lion W.l'er. 



K. F. S. 



IRVING CHRISTENSEN 



Vf.cc President 
EDGAR ROSS 



Secretary 
MELVIN LEMON 



Treasurer 

Carlton erickson 



Advisers 

ARTHUR G. BROWN 
DR. STEPHAN 



This group of K.F.S. men symbolizes the objectives of the organization in the letters of 
their fraternity; K, for knowledge! F, for friendship: and S, for society. Its aims are to improve 
social relationships at Stout and to build sincere friendships, as evidence of this, the ICF.S. has 

r*d actively into the social program of the year. 

The K.F.S. is now entering its second decade of providing fellowship for its members and 
contribute to the social life at Stout 

Notable features of the year included; winning a first for the Homecoming Float, a first in 
the F.O.B. Stunt Night Program, and sponsorship of the annual K.F.S. Dinner Dance, revived 
after a war-lapse of four years. 




Row One: JoJia Goodrich. Oiaiki ftierumfiofl. Clifford logwell. W«lt<j Cave, H»ri an d H«*clm«a '*' •! iun Andrew*. 

Raw Two; P*rnil HatntJan, Mr. Ray. Mr. Good, Mr, Johnwn. fiJehaid Hamilton. 

Row 7h««i liVLrrgi Bchm, Edward MudFt*. Roy So:.-, J„m« ShuJlii. Richard Volp. Marlottc Hate. Dooatd hi 

Row FflUK Harold Kofain, John Witrmen Gordon Undbtrg. Jame* Ttlgcn. Mennjr. Watfofl, OrBbfd Burtrtm, Jota JdJiskjo. Ray 



.-•:•■' • . 



Row Rvc: JoKph Iwrilei, /*w« Leigh, Om« B*r.n, Donnld Grunted, Walter Hnmnwfaur*. Wait*. Dweid, Rob^! DucJiarm* Robert 
Thqmfrtcm 



F. O. B. 



President 

WALTER CAVE 



Vice President 
HARLANO HESSELMAN 



Secretary 
CLIFFORD INGWELL 



Treasurer 
JOHN GOODRICH 



Advisers 
MR. RAV. MR, GOOD, MR. JOHNSON 



Phi Omega Beta i$ the oldest men's organization at Stout, taking an active interest in ail 
school activities and showing a major interest in athletics. High-lighting the F.O.8, sponsored 
elf-schooi activities for the year were the "Duffy's Tavern Dance," the all-school "Stunt Night,"' 
and The Melodies of Spring" — the semi -forma I which opened the spring social season. 

Pledges, wearing their traditional derbies and bow ties, have announced to the school their 
entrance into the organization, a delegation of derby-clad members assuring support at social 
functions. 



1*613 



SIGMA 



EUGENE MFLIER 
HERBERT WEND! 



• rent 
WESLEY KUCKUK 

UttHUH I 

ROLAND KEHRBERG 



Aek I 
DR. OtniNG, MR. NF.LSON 



A relatively new organization on the Stout Compus, 8131110 has given contributions to col- 
lege fife in the pa&l year. Sigma, leading the way in support of Ihc college union, contributed sub- 
stantially to furnishing! fei that project which the whole school now enjoy*. The Annual "Tacky 
Drag" sponsored by Sigma has already been made a tradition in Stout's social life, and the one 
, jeed memorable. From a chapter membership of sixteen in 1944, Sigma has grown 
into a working organization of twenty-five, with many alumni in the field. The principal aim of 
Sigma is to promote social and educational life in the college and in the lives of the fraternity 
members. 




: .i,m Wtitdl, Eu| '.' '••..'• lul • hrbug, Mr. N, •. .. 

How T«a* GHei WaiH. fi I || Jicl foiilcy, lowph Mo-wjiiJ, l!uo<fn.K Si'ijitAdi KiSmnf Moc, Robul Templo. 

■I i' '•'Mi*m Sxydo, Jn»ii B*i.r*l, G*«Ur5 Nrltpn. Rielti'd Kufthfariy, foorrjc Flu I 

RowPow • • • -■ i h ■ • ; I ■ iti •• I b I I ■ I bn, wlWium R< 

1 63 1 



PHALANX 



DOUGLAS SHERMAN 



OUANE PAyLElTNER 



i • ny and r#e h ur* 1 
MARTIN VfTZ 



Ad 
MR. JARVIS 



The beginning of the second semester marled the beginning of a new men's social organi- 
zation, Phalanx. Aim*, o\ Ibe organization are to promote a feeling of brotherhood and fraternal 
unity between the members and to provide service to the school Phalanx opened its social pro- 
gram with a smoker in February, With itf weekly upper meetings and frequent week-end ad 
ties climaxed by a dinner dance in May, Phalanx continued to enliven the program of extra-cur- 
ricular activities. With its excellent foundation. Phalanx should continue to expand and assume 
its place among the traditional organizations of Stout, 




Row One: lohn Pottfltan M.irim VM,' Ml ' ■' 

',■ •,. Nil i'.,i 'tttn, n rhwnu Kiel 
John Br'f. K«Antlh Onrfmg f*i1 Dihn< Dvan L«|ef«i 




fto* Orit: Je.v n, Bev«ify FjcBitad, Audicy Ang'r«mc<i. Mifioin TeB*«',, Htlcn OuflN'fig, M*ry Chinnocfc. 

Sow Two? Adek Ar.d«i.on, Miu J t {«, M>» R*imimiT, Will Van N<t* MEii Rogert. Mfji An|rim. AlTe* McVieor, 



INTERSOCIETY COUNCIL 

Existing as the governing body of the four women's societies, the Intersocicty Council is 
composed of the president and secretory of each society, together with the four advisers and 
dean of women. On the first Thursday of every month, they meet to discuss rules and such 
school events which the organizations sponsor, such as the stocking foot dance, the gala win- 
ter Intersocicty Ball in December, and two Intersocicty rushing parties for all freshmen women 
— a new procedure at Stout. By seeing that the society affairs run smoothly and by keeping all 
four societies in close friendly contact with each other, the htersoctety Council had proved to be 
a valuable organization. 



C<"3 



HaHBIBHHaHBaaBHHHBa _i 




Row One; Adelc Anderson. Mfriam TeBeetl. Mt» Rcxjeit. Eids Ellen Mcifeniie, Joy toerll>ry. 

Row Two: M#rUyn H&ywocd, Lorr#inc Nelton. Pfrylfii WaW», Rate Wary Olbcrt. H«<fi"tt H«yom«, LwcHIc Llndbcig, Loin Hcniey. 

Row Tnt<c: Lorh Countelii, Ruth KNiukt, Ann Hait, fiewno Bongey, Betty Oenft\. Janice Jewel. Pmt'iiw Moore, 

Row Four; Cfl'el Mfoddcr. Betty Kueml. Jeanne Greenlee, Aud'ey Vfjeruit, Kathryn Gerondale, PhyClit Johnjort, 



PALLAS ATHENE 



President 
MIRIAM Te&EEST 



Vice President 
EfDA ELLEN McKENZIE 



Secretory 

ADGLE ANDERSON 



Trcasuicr 

JOY MERKLEV 



Adviser 
MISS ROGERS 



Amid the bustle of another year, the Pallas Athene Society took an active port in sponsor- 
ing various school functions. Beginning the year's activities, fifteen pledges were formally initiated 
at the La Potnte home. The traditional Serenade added a cheery note to bleak October, Our 
president was Homecoming Queen, Highlighting the winter season was the all-school Snow Brawl, 
held in January. Traditionally' the annual Easter safe offered many varieties of handicraft and 
cookies made by each of the members. Informal dinners marked such special events of Thanks- 
giving, Christmas, mid-year graduation, Founder's Day. A senior dinner climaxed the year's ac- 
tivities. 



C«3 



S. M. A. 



President 

HELEN QUILLING 

Secretary 

MARy CHINNOCK 



Vice President 
MARJORIE POWERS 

Treasure* 
RUTH KNOWLES 



Adviser 
MISS JETER 

Signs of S,M A activity ore always present around the campus. The S.M.A.'s have quite 
a reputation for tradition, originality, and black dresses. The hishli S hts of its activities arc Sadie 
Hawkins' week, including the Valentine tea — lovely as ever — the corridor sale and the "Dog- 
Patch" dar.ee which climaxed the week's affairs. 

The cottage party was a grand success, despite sunburns and improvised sleeping facil- 
ities, fn those two days almost anything can happen, and usually docs. 

The S.M.A. has done a great deal as a group this year — morning hikes, a hayride, social 
gathering, dinners at the Anchor, and greatest of alf. the dinner dance. 

konnc Lemon, our president, left the second semester and Helen Quilling took her place* 




RcwOnr: Mftl J.-i,-< Ruth Kncwta, H<l-rn Ou-lHing. Ma'y ChiinocV. Marfotfa fW*u. 

fie* Two; )*ar Cvr, Mi i ■■ P<fe«l3a D-1tmr.fr, Pfcylllt Haflrnafl, Marian Eldred, Patricia Hciuic, Rulh Gilgcbacfc. 

ftow Ibttr.: Mary Log OH, Patricia Tr!ta«d, E«e< Mcdlilc, J«arn: Slerfltr, Joan Wildnur. Arlysi Van Rami. 

V.O* Four; Joan Trinmpton, ftulh NeurWan, Horfng NeltQA, FlSBCll Row? M.VY'Ar-r IV-ij-qr. 

C«*3 



PHILOMATHEAN 



President 

AUDREY ANDREASSEN 

Secretary 
ALICE McVlCAR 



Vice President 
ARLENE PICK 

TieMurer 
HA SAUTTER 



Adviser 

MISS VAN NESS 



The Phibmatheans began their social activities early in September by sponsoring the Phih 
Phrolix. on evening of dancing and entertainment which followed the festivities of the first foot- 
ball game. The Philo alumni breakfast at Our Saviour's Lutheran Church made Homecoming a 
memorable weekend. Teas and social meetings contributed to the active school year. Spring 
pledging ceremonies climaxed a most memorable year. 

The Phibmathcan society is the oldest social organization at Stout, having been organized 
in 1912 as a women's literary society. Today the organization provides an active social pro- 
gram in addition to its interest in good literature. 



TV t ^ 




k Soutfci. Miw Von Nk«. Audrey Andrcwm, MtM Kd, S 



sarttssrs: ■ ssafiaMisMxsB 



• 



C*?] 




Rc»r Ofte: Beverly Fjokted. Dcrothy Coftdry, Mill Rasmumn, ShMley Wmtfi, Jeanne Gcnw'in. 

fee* Twa: Mfjdtrt Pennington, Vcrna PWee, llfl J*«fc, Mary Lcnriic F'ibe'g, Olhre Bra- r , ; A .. Fi«b«. Mere* Tic*!, 

-•uc: Jean O-t^ll. Rc« Stiwrne, Maf-an f.entok, Beulah McDowell, Lorrmne Sthr-pugn. U«imhi Mu«0c'. 
R*" r Sdha*f<r, Fforenee Teagaicfer., Beverly Rutdal, Ruth G*ilfcr, Betlv ArJiterd-rcfe. 



HYPERIANS 



President 

BEVERLV FJELSTED 



Vice President 
SHlRLEy WASSEN 



Secretory 

JEANNE GONSOLIN 



Treasurer 

DOROTHy CONDRy 



Adviser 
MISS RASMUSSEN 



T„e year's full schedule for the Hyperions was begun early last fell when seventeen pledges 
woe initiated into the society. When Homecomlng-timc arrived, the Hyperfans worked hard 

on the float, which for the second consecutive time, received the honor of being "most humor- 
ous At a traditional breakfast they welcomed the alumnae to the Homecoming festivities and 
heard about the various occupations and adventures of these former students. 

_ During the year, members sold Stout stickers, Junior Bazaar Magazine subscriptions, and 
Christmas cards to boost their finances. With the coming of spring, the Hyperians sponsored 
a it. retried s tfay dance as well as the traditional "Old Heidelberg" tea. 



i: us i 




toes Thcmputn. Jeanne G'«r>kt, Mary Ann Dodge Helen M« . 
Row [»o: Sh^rtey tt'tiion, ftuSli Atncu, M«rf«r<i Ce>f, 



HOME ECONOMICS CLUB COUNCIL 



President 

MARy ANN DODGE 



Vice Prejident 
JOAN THOMPSON 



Secretory 

HELEN MELVILLE 



Treasurer 

MARGARET COX 



Adviser 
MISS MICHAELS 



Every woman who enrolls as a Home Economics student is eligible for membership in the 
Home Economics Club. Representatives are selected to serve on the council which arranges 
monthly meetings. Bach of these meetings presents a speaker who discusses a subject relative 
to Home Economics and allied fields. 

In October, five representatives of the club attended the state Home Economics Club meet- 
ing at Milwaufeee-Downer College. The traditional Yule Kaffe Lag was the feature event of this 
year's activities, 

Z&1 



STOUT TYPOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY 



President 
GORDON SKOUGE 

Secretary 

BRUCE CAMERON 



Vice President 

GILES WOOLF 

Tieaiurei 
WARD COWLES 



Adviser* 
MR. BAKER, MR, CARLSEN. MR. BARNARD 



The Stout Typographical Society, which is affiliated with the National Printing Education 
Guild and the Stout Printing Teachers' Association, was organized twenty-one years ago to pro- 
mote fellowship among the men majoring in *;he graphic arts, to stimulate the desire for addi- 
tional knowledge of these arts, and to analyze problems confronting teachers of printing. The 
SXS* furnished printed material for aJJ student activities and promotes, among other projects 
its annual field trip which gives members the opportunity to visit school and commercial shops 
throughout the mid-west, Membership is divided into three degrees — apprentice, journeyman, 
and master, and advancement through these stages is based on additional study and examina- 
tion. 




• MB, Ed-ard 8u»», G>lct Wflolf Biucc Cwncwn. Ward Cc*l<s. J»m« Leigh. DftvU BattttfO*. 
Re. Two: Fj.nl W**dt. J Ray Cornwall, BryO*. Hugh<t, Loui* ftete*. j«rn« foricy. 6V- • 

Row Thr«: £d*arrf MuQtr, Mail Hob*/, F.« fl k Cbrfc, Kermit Haat, UuUOdc. Heifatrt W**dt, 2*n«l Phut 



C?03 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 



President 
JOHN BA1RD 

Secre i ary-Trco Wirt r 
MARGARET COX 



Vice Present 
KILMER MOE 

Adviicf 

DR. STEPHAN 



A war has been won. We, fortunately, have been on the winning side. With the victory we 
inherited multitudes of complex problems; problems to which the solutions can be found only 
when each individual takes his part in the understanding of people, race, ideas, philosophies, 
and creeds which make up this complex world in which we exist. The Internationa! Relations Club! 
which is open to all who are interested in international problems, meets monthly to discuss cur- 
rent topics in world events. It does not restrict its activities to the campus alone, but partici- 
pates in the Mid-West International Relations Conference held in March each year. The dub as- 
sisted financially this year the American colleges which are located in Europe and Asia Minor. 




( Poweri. John 8-n 
'' • ■ ■ utl- At»t*h Maijprie Gould. D*wi*U L 

Row Tkrcc: Devojn ':•. ■Burt, Htrotd Rigft. 




j*u* Or.e: 5t i •- Stfu fctJti Wad Hubcr, J«tr« 3$iJ<Y. David Barjia:d, Worm R*ot, 8ay Ccrnwell. 
*:,-„ I--: CaroTm* Lanier. GoUudc Pwvoit, Doro&y Hutey* Jean ScJiwalbe. Ocflstty Kopp, Maiy Show, Oorit Brimmc. 
Row Thr«<r B«t!y Ku*ml, Ka!Ji<yr, GcfoodaJe. El!i*i-th Knrc. Dd Johnwrt, Leuis Surmerttcr, D&tigtai Sherman. Carol BiacV. 
Row Four; Wrlliom Baif-ey, J<an And*"; • 



THE STOUTONIA 



Editor 

JAMES BAILEY 



Business Manager 
MARK HUBER 



Adviser 

MR. BAKER 



The Stoutonfa has come a Ions wav s ' ncc •* was fittt published March 17. 1915. Today, 
more than ever before, the Stoutonia holds a prominent position as the voice oi the student 
body. To it falls the responsibility of recording news, features, editorials, and correspondence, 
wJircfi may be of interest to the student body, faculty, atumni, and other readers. 

In this first postwar year, the Stoutonia staff, under the editorship of James Bailey, points 
with journalistic pride to its accomplishments of the year in advancing its standards of journal- 
ism in a laboratory school where no journalism is offered. 

Membership on the staff offers many opportunities for a student to sain valuable exper- 
ience that conforms to good journalistic principles and practices. 

CM] 




LS-. ... 



Seaicd: Jeanne Greenlee, Virginia ftwwl, Ravmcwid Mr*1. 6««y K«e«L Jum Edcbcr^, Herbert Wats-p-ob-e. 

Sk*ndr<i.3: Louie Burmeitlef. RuikII Gerber. Clyde Scbwellenbaeb. 



TOWER STAFF 



Editor 

RAVMOND MIAL 



Adviicr 

MR. CHINNOCK 



For thirty-eight years students at Stout have awaited the spring publication of the year- 
book. Edited by students for students, the Tower presents the playtime and workaday activities 
of The Stout Institute. Informality is the keynote of the 1947 Tower as it is the keynote of the 
friendly spirit of the college itself. The members of the Tower staff hope the pictures of the cur- 
rent year will prove interesting and memorable to you in the days to come. 



C«3 



STOUT BAND 



President 
PAUL PARTRIDGE 



Vice President 
RICHARD ROEN 



Secretory and Treasurer 
FLORENCE TEEGARDEN 



Librarians 

WILLI AW BAILEY. GRACE SNOW 



Director 
MR. COOKE 



The post-war Stout band started off with a bang. Band membership has doubled in the past 
year. Through the efforts of Conductor Cooke and the diligent practice of instrument-tooting 
and toting charges, the band has participated in all local and Stout parades. 

The unique pep band, a true cross-sec tfon of the Stout band, has added some much- 
needed spirit at the basketball games. Strutting down the field between halves of our home 
football games could be seen our Stout band, in uniform step and uniform costume. Pfay 
Maestro! 




d* One: G;«* Snw.Thc&rJwe 7. : . ^n, E<j war <f ScfotlKfcieifa, Oehm Pi*r*S. OW fcowiclF. J«n Kcltan, 

v«ry t'rtt«rrt r M4<|Cc Thulj. 

* r -~' L H6wb«#. Owif WFwy, E»4 P««,„. William fefcy/Okcfa Salfandc. Cowia K« S K r V] f . 

>r a '•«* WB ' J ** fl B < 1 3< Wvrsr. Iho^at, Ert<ry Mdl6ff, Map* Lou M«y*r. 
Rw .j '■','■ *«'* "■•WiBBef. C«i«lyn I«ig)i4m, Mltdrcd Har*»*. Dorthy Kepo, A!b<:« Popper. *« w *. Schmidt. ViraU H#1vew«i. Vielot 
-. ''■ ,rc - i**** 1 " W*ftdt Dfllr Stcwcrt, Richard Ro<n. Lois QuKl. Aril* SWcuorv Mtwd P««i 

XtMhag.. irMty Enclim. Otv -•• Lwqufa; P*y| P*rtrk)g«. P.*'",* Gardner. Curlii Bright. Roibirri Bc«i«?, Mf. Code, 



THE ORCHESTRA 



President 
RUTH ANN CHRISTENSON 

SecrctOfy-TreosufCf 

ADELINE SCHAEFER 



Vice Prciicient 
GERALD STYER 

Adviser 
MR f HAROLO COOKE 



One of the factors contributing to the uniqueness of the Stout Symphonic Singers is the 
orchestral accompaniment. The orchestra consisting of about twenty members ployed the score 
of Bach's Oratoria with the choir in the annual Christmas program. They also accompanied the 
S.S.S. on their annual spring tour, played among other works. Ferdi Grofe's Mississippi Suite. 




Row On?.: Alison* $zh*eh', ft'.-th Am Crn.i1 cmcr>, Edwin StrSaSti* 1 I '• a Thorn*!. Maiy Lou W- 

HihIL 

Ro« Two; Nwffl.i ■'■•■"/ Lou OH. Ear! Dchnc, Edwin tbett, Richard fo " 5n©*. 

Row Thr«^: M«Myr Erfciiofl, Mr, Cool*. 51 - : . El Aioo, 



Row 0«e: C*«ol W"*dd<r. Ret* £«»<}. Rosemary Olbert, J«n Gontofin, Lorraine S<htougri. Flor.-. ; . Stvettoft, Etaine Leerokuif. /oy Med- 
ley, M/. Coolf, A-dfll Knufteft, Ffoiente Fccsaccfon. tl fl Sautter, J*** Cyr, Margaret PcnnJn^tan. Janice Sthetfct. Aub«ey ! 
Vivian Rotnem. 

Row Two: Audrey Harla<*der, f • ;.:an Wtfch, J<an Mwrc*y. Arlysi Van R«n$( leBeeit, Qtuct Watwjn. Phyl!i» John, 

ion. [fci.'t Counid ,r>.. VeHc Sneen, Gloria Schmidt, Ruth Samdahl, Fttfleti Row*, 

Re* Tnr.v: AdeTul . Waween, Jean Kelton, Frar>-<1 Q«UlBn. Emery NeliOn. CaHoH Sfusefl. Gerald Donley. Jarne* 

. Sofcfrt W3I amt, Jit.:-. Payne, Donald Brill, ftuth Aamtts. Helwi Qu IKng, Ruth Ann Cl*riit*n*ea., Maty Lou Meyer. 

Row rV»« WBJaiti Q^ilcv. Ha'old Oibom. Wa»en Pfc&p», George ZwnHMnoam. Robert Tnompto. Norman W«tK>n, AitKu* Medllic, Clif- 
ford Scott, Will ftffi Bottomfe) iota Sdlliliw. BvOfl Hughes. GeO'^r T • ifecil BainfsarL 

Row fiwe.- L**r<rt« Wns*il. Gordon Lfndberg Gerald Enerton. John Rowr, Tfeorna* Sterner. W'tum Halgren. c*>l Dchiic, Vergil Baintef. 
Irving 9«hn. MasV- 



THE SYMPHONIC SINGERS 



Chairman 
BYRON HUGHES 



Co*Chaiimar> 
PHYLLIS JOHNSON 



Sccf c td ry-Tf easwrcr 
HELEN QUILLING 



Adviser 

MR. H. COOKE 



The Stout Symphonic Singers in its tenth year continues to be an active organization with the 
largest membership in its history. An unusually busy season saw the presentation of their annual 
Christmas concert which included selections from Bach's Christmas Oratorio. In March the choir 
traveled to St, Paul where they were featured on the initial program of the newly organized St. 
Paul Symphony. Mr. Harold Cooke was the guest conductor for this concert. 

The climax of the annual spring tour in April was the appearance of the Symphonic Singers 
in a featured spot on All-American Day at the convention of the National Federation of Music 
Clubs held in Detroit, 



i" ■'' i 




Row One: Mdva Mfldicn, Evelyn Swift, Pfy Carolyn (ogham. Btity Janioi. Aide! I Uetxtc, J«n C»nJrel!, M«ig«>et F 

Jeanne Sand, Joyce liberg, Dorii Streeto*, Paliitsa Jpnet, Oorii; Zimmerman, Mfilma locment. 
Row Two: Elaine. JJoJinton, Patricia Feldt. Palnela Houle, Adene H«rcJi, Mary Loo Meyer, Carelinc Immt, Margaret P«ry. M«*toric 

Gculd. toil Fotehond, Phy'it ftattoi^ Elaine Wane )ohnw>fl, Rok Scionne. Helen MctvSIc, Adrlr And 
Row Three; Lo!i Guilt. Norma Cole, Modrlyn tricbon. Care! Bajttad. Karen N.elicn. Jean Sih-albe. M«um Wurtt, Uelb Dmrr.mond. 

Lou Jen*, Palcicua Gardiner, C- .'.'.•■■ -.toi, Jeanne Gtcentec, Ruth Kirchrrtr. 

Row Foui: R'jdollpii Albert, Herbert Watanabe. Cu'tit Briggt, Kenneth Darling, Karr Windberg. f>*u! Partridge. Warrc Fab, Gbi 

Patio, 
Row Five: Kenneth Krehn, Maiitya Tibbctn, Warren Ue. Kerrrvt Hat*, Duane Lebegue. Jonn Ha*l, Rum*K Gerfc>e>. Mcniy Ut 

Raymer-d Doarc, Donald Smith, 



THE COLLEGE CHOIR 

The College Choir has been newly organized this year and trains both men and women in 
developing better tone quality and voice control. This choir has proven successful in the fact 
that it eliminates the men's and women's 3k e clubs of previous years. This group contributed 
greatly to the success of the success of the annual Christmas concert. Among its other activities 
this year has been the singing of hymns in church services in Menomonie. 






Y. W. C. A. 



Pre ti done 
SHIRLEY SCHNITZLER 

Secretary 

LOIS KLUSMEVER 



Vice President 
OLIVE BROWNELL 

Treasure 

MILDRED HANSOM 



Advlitffi 



MJSS McCALMONT 



MrSS TRULLtNGER 



MJSS HARPER 

The campus sister movement was introduced to the new students through letters from the 
big sisters and the get-acquainted tea in September. We served coffee and doughnuts at the 
first open house to folfow the homecoming football game. Sunrise services followed by a break- 
fast were held at Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter. In helping others less fortunate, generous 
Thanksgiving and Christmas baskets were filled, and gifts were sent to a children's home. Desti- 
tute college students of other nations were aided through the World Student Service Fund drive. 
College Day of Prayer was observed with the other church organisations. A Mother-Daughter 
banquet ar\6 the senior picnic climaxed our major activities of the year. 




Full Row: MBdrcd Haoi&n Olive Brownel!. Wat MeCalrrwni. M:« Tiyllinger, MEit Harper. ShiiHey ScKniUier, LoU Sf.Wne.yeJ. 
Second Row; Lorraine S»rf(. Zcn-a Rae Wines, Dorothy K&pp, Scan, UndbUd, Margaret Co*, June Edcberg, Jariij Oebtei. 
Third Ro*: Genevieve Gaff. Ua King. Oo-o'.hf Huley, Mnrjati-e Gould, K»rcn Nidwn, Maty Shaw. Jflnct Roftj*'. 
Fou-lli Ao-«r: Jean Wtnusr, Dct«nc,y Jokntort, Marv«) Oellir, Rgk Marie Tkorsbalt-en, Joyce Robbe. Joyce Ubeig, Elaine Johnson 



ARTS AND CRAFTS 



President 
JAMES PAYNE 

Secretory 
MARLOTTE HOLTZ 



Vice President 
ZENAS PRUST 

Treasurer 

ROBERT THOMAS 



Adviser 
MR. KRANZUSGH 

The Stout Arts and Crafts Club is comprised of student and faculty members who are in 
tercsted in hobby and craft work. Each member has an opportunity to work with any craft medi- 
um in which he is interested. Through its activities, the Arts and Crafts Club promotes the worthy 
use of leisure time and gives its members an opportunity to learn about the organization and 

functions of craft clubs. 

This year marks the first time in the organization's history that its membership has been ex- 
tended to the division of Home Economics. Organized in 1931, the club now has a total of 3S 

resident members. 




Row Oflct Robot Thontos. Jemcx Payne, M», Kiarnmeh, Zenu Pruti. Marlon* Kolir. 

Row Two: Robert Martin. Chiirlej RjcJiardton, Kilmer, Min HonriUon, Wns Raunutxn, Helen K'anwMh, Palfrey O'C 

p\i»cfe«oii, flflnjam«n Sanderi, Omo Bonn, 
Row Hirae: R«y Kranmtdrt. Clifford Ingwcil. Waldoi Robbing Own Van Pattet, H«iV«r| Wersdt. Lowell Tuft, Cvlton Erielion, Donald 

Llppold, J&hn RicceJli. 
Row Four: Paul Laner.. WiBcam Andean. William Rocrig, Kcna<th Wold, Eugene Dyi#. Uwrew Wrijht Uoyd Yandebers, Milton 

Miller, Paul Ingwell, 

£791 







Row On<: (.Hjnsl Gardner M'. Klflffl • f 'amcJO¥, Paul Li" 

Row Two: Pm iofrf Rotnr-m. Harold R.ggt. BUI Bottomlty. Donald E' 



RADIO CLUB 



President 
JACK POMEROV 



Vice Pie&ident 
LIONEL GARDINER 



Secrctary-Tfcosuicr 
PAUL LARSEN 



Adviser 
MR. KRANZUSCH 



The Stout Radio Club, the first radio organization in Stout's history, was organized in Jan- 
uary, 1947. The club members are persons interested in radio as a hobby. A room in the Trades 
Building has been officially named the Radio Room. One of the many opportunities offered by 
the club is aid to members in obtaining an amateur radio license. Anyone interested, if he has 
a 1.2 grade point, can apply for membership in the Stout Radio Club. 



[»3 




Rpw One; Eugene Wilier, Gibiem Van Patter, Clyd< Sthwelrcnbach, <3«org.- Hnctti Jottpti Longo, E«n«it Hauek*. Pfiilip UBwdr. 

Sew Two: William Snyder. Fmit Tanl, /ohfs Mcjic, Raymond P-ctryt. Jam<i Bohn, Neil Palfi>c«. 

Row TVcc: JoKn Saird. Jamti ft&etwell, Htflry Pctcrmn. M«rl*in Ofiofl. Donald Fahrman, Rodnty Hanton, William Halgtco. 



THE RIFLE CLUB 



President 
GEORGE TJNETTi 



Vice President 
CLVDE SCHWELLEN6ACH 



Executive Office* 

IBSON VAN PATTER 



Secretary and Treasure? 
JOSEPH LONGO 



Chief Instructof 
PHILIP LaBOftDE 



Advisers 
DR, E. R. GETTING. MR, H. ARNESON 



The Rifle Gob Is the youngest organization on the campus; however, in reality it is a re- 
vival of the once very active Rifle Club officially disbanded in 1937. 

The object of the organization is the encouragement of organized rifle and pistol shooting 
among citizens of the United States, residents in our community and students of Stout, with a 
view towards a better knowledge of the safe handling and proper care of firearms, as well as 
improved marksmanship and those characteristics of honesty, good fellowship, self discipline, 
team plan and self reliance. The Rifle Club is affiliated as a Class A Club with The National 
Rifle Association, 



■■ 







I IF 

J,« s g I •• 

■ S ' - J | " v 



1 ' £ 

I . ■ . 






Football Scores for the 1946 Season 

STOUT OPPONENTS 

6 CARLETON . 20 

RIVER FALLS 20 

6 ,, LA CROSSE 6 

13 SUPERIOR . 13 

15 MOOREHEA0 13 

7 EAU CLAIRE [Ho^com^gj 6 

With the opening of a new school year each foil it is synonymous to think of football and 
the type of team which will be produced. Most successful seasons are measured in wins and 

loses of the team from the spectators' viewpoint, but if we look at the coach's viewpoint, he 
measures the success of his team by the improvement they show from game to game. 

At the start of last season the outlook for a successful season at Stout was very dark. A? 
the season progressed a marked degree of improvement was noted in each game and the [ -,.-.>■ 
of performance was attained in the Homecoming game. Stout entered the game a decided un- 
derdog and by playing alert football emerged from the game victors with just reasons for being 
proud of their victory* 

The coaching staff of head coach, Ray C. Johnson, and his assistant head line coach, K. 
C, Wennerberg, and assistant line coach. J. EL ShuEtis. feel that a successful season was com- 
pleted by the team when they could see their coaching technique being evidenced by the 
team's showing in the opening game and the progress to the season's closing game. 

SENIOR LETTERMEN: 

William Andrews — A four year Ictterman whose home is in Superior. Wisconsin. He was the 
captain of the team in his senior year and made all conference selection in his junior and senior 
years at Stout. Andrews was a versatile player who served at all positions equally well and con- 
sidered the season successful if Stout could beat Superior, 

ALL CONFERENCE MEN: 

Andrews. William — Senior — back — Superior. Wisconsin 
Hammerbcrg, Wallace — Sophomore — tackle— New London, Wisconsin 
Wyzkowski, Chester — freshman — end — Wausau. Wisconsin 
Young, Robert — 'freshman — halfback — Wausau, Wisconsin 



C«3 



< 









>' 




1 1 






THE BASKETBALL TEAM 

The Stout basketball team had trouble finding the range in the early part of the season; as 
mid-season rolled around there was nothing to stop them, nnd th. down the homestretch 

in a blaze of glory to take second place honors in the Northern Division Teachers College Con* 
ference. 

In nonconference play The Blue Devils handed defeats to such highly rated teams as Wi- 
nona (6543). St, Mary's (42-40), Oshkoth (48 45), Carleton (47-44). and St. Cloud (51-47), They 
Hamline (41-61), Milwaukee (43-45). and St. Johns (50-52). 



Ea 



In conference play th. a men got off to a bad start losing to River Falls (37-56) and 

u Claire (37-41), Hesselmon and Company then proceeded to get down to business, and fin- 



\c season was 10 wins 



J the icoton winning five more games and losing one. The record for 
ist 6 losses. 

The highlight! ,oson were; The Blue Devils' savage attacks against River Falls (6346) 

fcau Claire (77-44), and La Crosse (74-53). Individual scoring honors went to Captain Harfey He*- 
selman with e total of 216 points. Don Grunsted and Ray Wenzel followed with 155 and 153 
points respectively, 

Four seniors ended th, | basketball careers. They were Harfey Hesselman, Don Gun- 



n, and Joe Seri 










• 



7* 



\ 



■ 



-i|M: fc«, D Mn , jc«n na GwwU. JHUi St.** W.1m» loamm. 



CHEER LEADERS 



This year cheer leaders were selected by the S.S.A. officers and a faculty advisor. Those 
elected from the competitive try-out in the fall led the rootin 3 section at pep assemblies and 
at games for the remainder of the year. At the end of two years' service, a cheer leader may re- 
ceive a letter, Jeanne Gonsolin and Harold Richtcr were the only members to receive a "S" this 
year. 

During the year, Jeanne Goniolin. Wilma Loomans. Jeanne Sand, and Ray Doanc led the 
cheers for our Alma Mater with the aid of Lucille Benzel. Harold Richter. and Gerald Styer 
throughout the football season. One of their most commendable achievements was awakening 
a sportsman-like attitude among the fans and students who attended our athletic cv> 



I>?1 



I 



^ 


f : 7 


1 ^^ ; 


H ' Lfl| 


i IP J 






1* 




"™J1 



#6lt<f D<i'. • I '■ lilt I • ' ' 

Robin J<v"--i I oil •■. 
tow I .... Pttcnan, Fred • I I N ul*? 



"S" CLUB 



tent 
ID GRUN 



Vice Puciidcnl 
WILLIAM ANDREWS 



JOSEPH SERFLEK 



MD KE MR BERG 



COACH JOHNSON, MP. 



Only th who hove earned their major "S" er« eligible for membership in the "S" 

Club, rhis organization, which today ii the leading athletic club in Ffic Stout Institute was or- 
ganized during the Homecoming of 1930. The objective?, set up by the club at that time and 
still recognized today are to build and eneoutogc better college spirit, to give recognition to 

'men of the college, and to provide mtt>i)i by which Stout athletes con retain the friend- 
ships Ihey have made while in college, 




Rflv On<: Dcwifl* Km|K U«4I WIMwd F<*k, Row** longcy. I 

RvOw fwO! J rt f i i OiblC. Zotll lUn WIlUJ ' '.' • . I Btj • I 

V44WJ«lbtif|< Ci'l | NlK Nrilt/fl, N*ncy *■' 

RoUm M<.. 
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Row Foui! Fiaie*i< Joyce M«y<-» ' *Mif». &*«»■ 

Jr*n OiHm»n, Sbll1*y SuUibtrg. Jaac Edrhtfrg. E-ken Dtflmim. 
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W. A. A. 



President 
MILDRED RASE 



President 
ROSANN BONG6Y 



S«C«:tJiiy 

eerry achterkiroh 



Treasurer 
LUCILLE UNDBERG 



Adviser 

MISS MILLER 



The Women'* Athletic Association of The Stout Institute has for its chief aim promoting 
active participation of the women students in recreational activities. 

In September, the W.A.A. entertained oil freshman girls with a Scavenger Hunt. 

For the second year, an inter-collegiate basketball game was played here as the feature event 
of sports night. The opponent was the River Falls W,A>A. 

Sale of hot dogs and ice cream sandwiches ftt the football games helped to establish funds 
for the different events of the year. 



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